Category Archives: Band

Students, teacher discuss role of music in their lives, society

By Garrett Garroutte
Staff Writer

Carl Curtis, a music teacher at Daniel Webster Broadcasting and Digital Media Magnet High School, has been involved in music since the age of 14, which according to him, adds up to about 40 years.

Curtis plays the piano, and his favorite type of music is jazz. His favorite artist is Chick Corea. Music is important to Curtis.

“It gives me a sense of accomplishment and focus,” he said.

Curtis said music is important to the world.

“It is a piece of every culture in the world and has been around since the dawn of time,” he said. “Turn on your TV or radio and see if you can get by without hearing music.”

Curtis said music has helped try and right the wrongs in the world.

He said it was a big part of the peace movement and the civil rights movement.

Dylan LaCrone, a Webster student, has been involved in music since fifth grade. He plays flute, saxophone and piano and has a music scholarship to the University of Tulsa.

He said music is very important in his life.

“It has brought people from low points in their life,” he said.

Gabbie Wright, also a Webster student, has been involved in music since fifth grade and plays a variety of instruments: flute, bassoon, piano and piccolo.

Wright said music just makes her happy and keeps her busy at the same time.

Her favorite type of music is metal, “because the concerts are really fun,” she said.

Kristy Fleming, another Webster student, has been involved with music for 12 years.

“Music has helped me see the beauty of everything,” said Fleming.

She said she enjoys folk music.

“It’s the voice of a common man,” Fleming said.

Fleming plays the violin, viola, cello, bass, mandolin, banjo, vibraphone and dobro.

“Music has defined not only my personality, but every other area of my life,” she said. “Music is the purest facet of the human experience. It goes beyond words.”

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Concert set for Thursday

By MiKayla Massey and Jerick White
Staff Writers

Daniel Webster Broadcasting and Digital Media Magnet High School’s chorus and band will have their annual winter concert at 7 p.m. Thursday. The concert is open to the public.

From the band, there will be different selections of music, fast and slow.

“I’m excited for chorus’ first concert, and showing what they can do,” said chorus teacher Janice Drummond.

Band student Alex Davis said performing makes her feel like she’s good at something.

“You can only play as good as you practice,” she said.

Chorus student Michelle Hollingshead expects a lot of students to attend the concert. She said she feels that there will be “a whole bunch of people” staring at her.

“I hope I don’t make myself look stupid,” she said.

Another Webster band member, Jackson Harrison, said he feels kind of excited about the performance.

He said he does not expect a lot of people besides parents and friends to attend.

Harrison said he likes to perform and be onstage. He used to get nervous, but he doesn’t any more, because he’s used to it now, he said.

He is looking forward to performing well.

“I like being in band. Music is special to me,” Harrison said.

Band to replace old uniforms

Keiyana Cheatham performs with the Webster band during a recent football game. PHOTO BY JASIE JAMES

Jessica Lopez
Staff Writer

For the past few weeks, the band from Webster has been working hard. The students recently began learning a new piece called “Birdland.”

Jackson Harrison, who is fourth chair trumpet, likes the song.

“It’s challenging but really good,” he said. “I’m looking forward to performing it.”

He said the band might be getting new uniforms, since the ones being used are “outdated.”

This was reaffirmed by Carl Curtis, band director, via e-mail. Curtis was told  in a Sept. 28 meeting that Webster is getting uniforms in the spring of 2013.

According to the information given to Curtis, there are three phases of bond money appropriations, and Webster is in the third phase. This means the uniforms will be finished in the fall of 2012 and will arrive in the spring of 2013.

Curtis said he was told all TPS band programs are getting $1,600 to $2,000 in bond money per year during a six-year period to help schools buy new instruments.

Although the instruments cost more than the money being given, Curtis said, “Every little bit helps, and I am always grateful for what I can get.”

Webster Performs in Honor Band

 

Thirteen Webster students performed in the Tulsa Public Schools Honor Band.

Niyasia Askew
Staff Writer

What’s Honor Band? The Tulsa Public Schools Honor Band is a prestigious organization in which students from all nine high schools audition and those who do the best are chosen to be a part. The group meets for two evening rehearsals and one all-day rehearsal and then performs music under a guest conductor, Webster Band Director Carl Curtis said.

Mr. Curtis said he feels that this organization is a great motivator for students to do their best on their instruments, not only for the audition but the performance. It also helps them meet other young musicians in Tulsa and make music with them, he added.

The TPS Honor Band has been in existence for about 20 or more years, Mr. Curtis said. Tulsa music directors wanted a group that would encourage their students to excel, he added.

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Webster band performs at Fall Fest

By Ashley Hurlbut

Staff Writer

Daniel Webster Warrior Spirit Winds performed in the 2009 Fall Fest, which was held Nov. 19 in the new auditorium at Clinton Middle School. Clinton’s band also performed.

Fall Fest was the first concert performance for the Webster band, Media and Advertisement Consultant Tisha Jones said. The Warrior Spirit Winds started the show with songs from the movie Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. They played “Ginny,”  “The Story Begins,” “In Noctem,” “Dumbledore’s Farewell” and “The Friends.”

“The performance was great, the black lighting and fog set the tone of the theme and the drum line was awesome,” Ms. Jones said.

It was the first time that some of the band members from Webster were also part of the flag routine, which was performed under black lights.  This effect made it look like the flags were moving on their own.

The Warrior Spirit Winds Percussion Ensemble played “wi-fi,” “The Big Bang,” “Warrior Cry” and “fish.net.” When they were performing under black lights the drum mallets looked like they were floating in mid-air.

“All of them were first-time drummers except one,” Ms. Jones said. “Overall it was a great performance,” she said.

The auditorium was filled with people for the performance. Some of the people had to stand in the back during the show because all of the seats were filled.

The Warrior Spirit Winds is made up of: Crystal Davidson, Alex Davis, Briann Piguet, Kayla Richardson and Gabbie Wright on flute, Madi Barbi, Kalyn Bender, Kevin Howlingcrane and Keiyana Cheatham on clarinet, Tiffany Larson on alto sax, Alex Davis on tenor sax., Cassie Hale and Pamela Miller on trumpet, Victoria Howard on mellophone, Alex Hulett on baritone, Daniel Kilgore on sousaphone, Austin Graves, Tiffany Larson and Alex Hulett on percussion.

The Percussion Ensemble is made up of   Keiyana Cheatham, Crystal Davis and Austin Graves on snare, Tiffany Larson and Pamela Miller on quads, Kevin Howlingcrane on cymbals and Madi Barbi, Kalyn Bender, Alex Davis and Cassie Hale on brass drum.

Contact the Webster Weekly at websterweekly@gmail.com.